How to filter rows in table item in a report having its own data souce

3 posts, 1 answers
  1. Edward
    Edward avatar
    58 posts
    Member since:
    Oct 2018

    Posted 17 Oct 2018 Link to this post

    Could you give example of how to set the Filter property of a table in a report which has its own datasource set (i.e. the table does), so that the rows of the table can be filtered by a dataitem from the report's own datasource.  (So there is two datasources, one for the report and one for the table in the report, and want to filter the table rows by a field value from the report's main datasource.)
  2. Answer
    Silviya
    Admin
    Silviya avatar
    354 posts

    Posted 22 Oct 2018 Link to this post

    Hello Edward,

    You can filter the table datasource based on the main report's datasource by using =ReportItem.DataObject (check this screen shot for reference - https://www.screencast.com/t/e0iHs0Bn). From here on, you can define the field you would filter on, i.e.:
    =ReportItem.DataObject.FieldFromMainReport

    More information is available in the following help articles as well:
    How to: Add filtering to Table item and Crosstab item
    How to use the ReportItem.DataObject property in expressions

    Regards,
    Silviya
    Progress Telerik
    Do you want to have your say when we set our development plans? Do you want to know when a feature you care about is added or when a bug fixed? Explore the Telerik Feedback Portal and vote to affect the priority of the items
  3. Edward
    Edward avatar
    58 posts
    Member since:
    Oct 2018

    Posted 23 Oct 2018 Link to this post

    NOTE:

    The syntax used was:
    = Fields.attributes.parentglobalid = = ReportItem.DataObject.attributes.globalid

    For definition purpose, referencing the datasource of the table starts with Fields, whereas referencing the datasource of the main report starts with ReportItem.DataObject.  Because my data had additional key tags in the json structure, I had to add 'attributes', but the strategies are essentially same.

Back to Top