How Facebook messed up their mobile app with Phonegap video...

4 posts, 0 answers
  1. Jan-Dirk
    Jan-Dirk avatar
    327 posts
    Member since:
    Jun 2012

    Posted 25 Apr 2013 Link to this post

    I short while ago I saw a video where someone showed a mobile app against Facebooks official app. As some of you might know, Facebook has used (a modified) Phonegap to build their app. When they failed, they went back to native development.

    In the video you could see that someone created an app with exactly the same functionality as in the official Facebook app. However, I am not sure if it was shown on iOS or Android.

    Unfortunately, I can't find the video anymore. I need to convince someone that Icenium/Phonegap is the way to go, instead of native development.

    If you have seen the video and know the url to it, then please post here.

    Thank you!
  2. David Silveria
    David Silveria avatar
    234 posts
    Member since:
    May 2006

    Posted 25 Apr 2013 Link to this post

    Probably the app you refer to is fastbook  -http://www.networkworld.com/news/2012/121712-fastbook-265173.html.
  3. Jan-Dirk
    Jan-Dirk avatar
    327 posts
    Member since:
    Jun 2012

    Posted 25 Apr 2013 Link to this post

    Yep, that is the one! Thank you very much!
  4. Jason
    Jason avatar
    21 posts
    Member since:
    Apr 2013

    Posted 12 May 2013 Link to this post

    That video is mostly a sham (IMO) as it only focuses on the technical aspects, and by that, mostly around performance.
    While important, and again , this is only my opinion, native is always going to be faster than a hybrid application. 

    Most technical people will know that, for starters, there are additional translation layers that the hybrid model must go through and technical limitations (or inefficiencies) that are imposed on this approach (Re the Web UI view that Hybrid apps have Vs native Safari performance as one common example) 

    Yes, it is of-course technical possible (and does happen) to have faster hybrid apps over native ones, however, in such cases, the hybrid app was just build by a better team than the one that built the native one. If you have the same people building the same app across both paradigms, the native team will always perform better... however, this is not where the strength lies. 

    From a commercial perspective, its the ability to have a near identical code base for multiple platforms.  The people that make the decisions are business folk and don't care so much about technical matters. They want to hear about such things as time to deliver, ROI etc and unless you are a big company like Facebook where you can afford to have multiple platform teams, building a Hybrid app makes absolute sense. When I have discussions with such folk this is a key factor as well as the ability to built an app more quickly (sometimes).  The fact that you only require one skillset (mostly) across multiple platforms reduces costs and eases the burden of resource management of staff as well.  These are the items that most of the people I talk to understand and value more. The fact that hybrid apps can be fast should be (and is) taken as a given. 
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