Barcodes from web request

5 posts, 0 answers
  1. Neil
    Neil avatar
    34 posts
    Member since:
    Sep 2012

    Posted 26 Jun 2012 Link to this post

    I saw from an earlier thread that telerik isn't supporting image rendering of bar codes. To get around this I am using abcpdf's ability to take web pages and turn them into pdf files (which is ultimately what I need anyway). However, when I get the page rendered in this way (effectively rendered via the microbrowser in abcpdf) the barcode never shows up. I'm assuming this is because it requires the browser to actually display the page in order for the barcode to render? Is there any way of getting a rendered barcode to work in this manner?
  2. Vasil
    Admin
    Vasil avatar
    1547 posts

    Posted 28 Jun 2012 Link to this post

    Hi Neil,

    As you know the RadBarcode is quite new control and currently there is no way to export or output as image. We are continue its developing and growing. And we are working on image rendering, I can not promise the feature for the next release, but we will do all possible to make it happen.

    Kind regards,
    Vasil
    the Telerik team
    If you want to get updates on new releases, tips and tricks and sneak peeks at our product labs directly from the developers working on the RadControls for ASP.NET AJAX, subscribe to their blog feed now.
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  4. Neil
    Neil avatar
    34 posts
    Member since:
    Sep 2012

    Posted 28 Jun 2012 Link to this post

    OK. I'll use another product for now. Looking forward to what you guys come up with.
  5. Jay
    Jay avatar
    1 posts
    Member since:
    May 2013

    Posted 23 May 2013 Link to this post

    Barcode readers ensure better functioning of business processes with efficient and accurate automatic identification of products. Various barcode technologies have evolved that help in tracking inventory tracking, monitoring stock movement, increasing operational efficiency, improving employee productivity, etc. Various types of barcode technologies are used effectively across various sectors like healthcare, hospitality, retail, manufacturing, distribution, warehousing, etc.

    Barcode Reader Technologies:
    Deciding on which barcode reader technology depends upon the type of barcode that will be scanned, the environment in which it will be used, and the connection type required (i.e. USB, serial, or keyboard).

    Pen-Style Readers
    Pen-style barcode readers, also called wand barcode readers, consist of a light source and a photo diode placed next to each other at the tip of the pen. As the pen is swiped across the barcode number the photo diode measures the intensity of light reflected from the surface. A waveform is generated that represents the exact widths of bars and spaces in the barcode. The dark color of bars absorbs light while the white spaces reflect light, thereby making a specific pattern of waveform. This voltage waveform is then converted by the pen-type reader to retrieve product information quickly. Because wand readers are manually swiped across the barcode, they are not limited by the width of the barcode. They do require the user to pass the wand over the barcode at a consistent rate of speed and at a particular angle. The pen-type readers are not the most efficient scanners, but they are small, extremely durable, and economical. Pen-style barcode readers are suited for low-volume and desktop applications.

    Laser Scanners
    Laser barcode scanners offer more precise readability of barcodes as a laser beam is employed instead of a light source. An oscillating mirror or a rotating prism is used to move the laser beam back and forth across the barcode. The brightness and sharpness of laser beam ensures preciseness and greater accuracy in reading barcodes. Laser scanners can read the barcodes from greater distances and are ideal for applications where barcodes need to be read in bright light.

    CCD Readers
    CCD (Charged Coupled Device) readers, also called linear imager barcode scanners, consist of a series of tiny light sensors that measure the intensity of light that is right in front of them. Linear imagers can effectively read barcodes from a few inches to several feet away. They are more robust and are designed to withstand harsh working conditions. Linear imagers are suited for use in various sectors like retail, distribution, shipping, receiving, and inventory.

    Camera Based Readers
    The latest in the barcode reader technology is the camera-based barcode readers or 2D imaging scanners. They utilize a small camera to take an image of the barcode and then process this image using advanced digital image processing techniques to decode the barcode. This reader forms an image using sensors arranged in hundreds of rows. 2D barcode scanners can even retrieve information from barcode labels that they are wrinkled or damaged. These scanners have capability to read barcodes moving at faster rates like cartons on a conveyor belt. 2D Barcode Scanners read barcodes omnidirectionally, so the barcodes can be orientated in any direction. Some 2D barcode scanners can also capture digital images and signatures.

    Omnidirectional Barcode Scanners
    Omnidirectional barcode scanners disperse laser beams in every direction making it possible to read the barcode from every possible angle. A rotating mirror and a set of fixed mirrors are used in omnidirectional barcode scanners to generate the pattern of laser beams. These scanners have higher barcode scanning capability with scan ranges varying between few inches to several feet. Omnidirectional barcode scanners can be put to use in retail environments where barcodes have to be read at a distance of few inches or in industries where barcodes have be read from a distance of few feet in harsh conditions. It can also read barcodes if they are torn, wrinkled, or damaged.

    Cell Phone Cameras
    Barcode scanning apps are now available for certain cell phones with cameras. Some 2D barcodes like QR and Data Matrix codes are optimized for scanning by cell phones. Although this technology is still in its nascent stage, it opens a wide range of opportunities for possible applications. At present, iPhone and a few phones using the Google Android platform have barcode scanning apps available for use. Most of these apps are designed as shopping tools. They use the barcode number to search a number of web sites, like Amazon and Google, to pull up product information, price comparisons, and customer reviews. Some will even utilize the GPS in the phone to locate the nearest store that has the item in stock. Cell phone barcode scanning can be put to various other uses like giving access to valid ticket holders at venues, personal finance, inventory reporting, asset tracking, shopping etc.



  6. Vasil
    Admin
    Vasil avatar
    1547 posts

    Posted 23 May 2013 Link to this post

    Hi Jay,

    I have removed the links from your post, since we do not tolerate advertising in our forums. I would kindly ask you to not spam anymore, to avoid forbidding your writing permissions.

    I have kept the text in your post, since it is very informative and can help someone to get more clear idea what Barcode is.

    Regards,
    Vasil
    Telerik
    If you want to get updates on new releases, tips and tricks and sneak peeks at our product labs directly from the developers working on the RadControls for ASP.NET AJAX, subscribe to their blog feed now.
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