We’re pleased to announce Test Studio R1 2013 is publicly available for download. We’ve been spreading out bits and pieces of information about the upcoming release via videos, blog posts, and the roadmap; however, let me recap in case you missed all that.

User Interface Overhaul

This one’s right in your face, from the moment you start up Test Studio! We’ve worked hard to freshen up the user interface and make it cleaner and a bit more intuitive. We’ve slightly redone a few workflows throughout the product. You’ll continue to see improvements in UX as we continue evolving the product.

Cross-Browser Recording

This is exciting! You’re now able to record in any of our supported browsers: Safari, Firefox, and Chrome! The new recorder lives entirely in those browsers, and it’s undergone significant improvements. You’ll fly though adding in verifications, explicit waits for dealing with asynchronous operations, and exploring your Document Object Model.

New Scheduling and Execution Infrastructure

This is by far the largest piece of work done for R1. We ripped out the guts of Test Studio and completely rewrote the scheduling and execution pieces. You can now split one test list across multiple execution engines. This means your test list gets executed in parallel, so it’s dramatically faster. Shorter feedback loops, FTW! Additionally, we’ve reworked the scheduling engine to make it easier to set up your scheduled test lists. It’s smoother, and you’ll be able to take advantage of our new storage service that speeds up working with your test execution.

Load Testing Enhancements

Load tests are now treated just like every other test type: you can schedule them, you can distribute them, and you can mix them in lists with your other tests. This means you can start off a load test and have a set of performance and functional tests running to measure different aspects of your system while it’s under load.


You’re going to be very happy if you’re working with large projects and/or large element repositories! We’ve done a tremendous amount of work optimizing how Test Studio handles memory internally, and the speed with which we load projects and tests.

What should you do next? Run, don’t walk, and go download the installer! Next, go sign up for the release webinar!

About the author

Jim Holmes

Jim Holmes

has around 25 years IT experience. He is co-author of "Windows Developer Power Tools" and Chief Cat Herder of the CodeMash Conference. He's a blogger and evangelist for Telerik’s Test Studio, an awesome set of tools to help teams deliver better software. Find him as @aJimHolmes on Twitter.


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