• Cloud Mobile

    Custom Cordova Plugins with Icenium…and More!

    Icenium 1.6 is Here! We are very excited about the new features in this release! Especially the fact that Icenium now supports the use of custom Cordova plugins! The key highlights I want to briefly cover from version 1.6 are: Cordova 2.7.0 Support, Custom Cordova Plugins (!) and an experimental UI Designer...
  • Cloud Mobile

    Uploading Files to Everlive

    Everlive isn't just capable of storing data - it can store files as well. In this post we examine how Everlive stores files, and a simple working example on uploading & retrieving files from Everlive.
  • Cloud Mobile

    Introducing authentication with Facebook, Google, and LiveID to Icenium Everlive

    With the growing popularity of social networks, more and more mobile apps offer you the ability to login with your social account. Clients love it because of the simplicity if offers. As a developer this is a feature you expect from your BaaS vendor instead of crafting your own user management system.
  • Cloud Mobile

    Icenium Everlive Keynote Demo (Recap)

    June 12, 2013 Share
    On May 29th, 2013, several of us participated in a webinar covering the new release of Icenium (you can see a recording of the webinar event here). I had a chance to share a bit about Everlive - a new backend-as-a-service offering allowing you to store data and files, manage users and more in the "cloud". As part of the demo, I created a very simple note-taking mobile app and walked us through tying Everlive into it so we could create, store and retrieve notes, as well as register new users to the application and more. Let's take a brief moment to highlight the relevant (Everlive) portions of the demo app...
  • Cloud Mobile

    Is This Thing On? (Part 4)

    This is Part 4 of a four part series where we explore some of the tools available to detect and manage online/offline connectivity in web/mobile applications. In Part 1 we looked at the available APIs for detecting connectivity state (and the woes associated with them). In Part 2 we wrote a hand-rolled abstraction to manage using these APIs together and began to see elements of a state machine emerge from the chaos. In Part 3 we explored how we can keep our FSMs from violating SRP, and set the stage for using multiple FSMs together to model more complex application behavior. In this final part of the series, we look at setting up hierarchical FSMs to manage more complex behavior.